small apartments

Buyers shift focus to shoebox units: DTZ

Buyers are being drawn to more affordable and smaller units following the government’s latest property cooling measures and stricter loan rules, according to a report from DTZ. During the second quarter, 2,571 buyers (38 percent) opted to buy homes below S$1 million, higher than the 1,835 buyers (31 percent) in the previous quarter. Purchases between S$1 million to S$1.5 million also increased to 33...

Demand for shoebox units cools off

The hype over shoebox property units seems to have cooled down. Sales transactions in these small private apartments have fallen by 46 per cent in the second half of 2012. In the second half of 2012, some 1372 units were transacted compared to 2539 units in the first half of last year. Experts cited fewer launches as developers focus on building bigger units to meet demand. Still, analysts said there...

Tiny homes under scrutiny

Many Singaporeans might think that shoebox units are small but there’s another type of micro home that has taken off in other parts of Asia, most notably in China and Japan. Called capsule homes, such units are much smaller than shoebox apartments. Some of these units can be as tiny as seven ft long, six ft tall and four ft wide as evidenced in some developments located in the outskirts of China’s...

Sales of shoebox units fall after govt announcement

Sales of small private apartments, commonly known as shoebox units in Singapore, have taken a downward turn. Data compiled by analysts show that new sales fell about 57 per cent in September from the previous month to 99 units. The fall in the sale of shoebox units occured after the government announced that it will moderate the number of shoebox apartments entering the market. Analysts said buyers are...

Cities need to relook shoebox living

The controversy surrounding shoebox units has spurred many diverse viewpoints in the past. And now a new report by Savills Research called “Shoebox units – Is small smart or is bigger better?” is championing the role such homes have in major cities around the world. According to Savills, homes as small as 250 sq ft can successfully meet demand for city centre living amongst young professionals, for...

Subdued impact from new guideline

The Government's long-awaited policy measure on "shoebox" apartments was finally announced this week and it has made far less of an impact than earlier feared. The new Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA) guideline, kicking in on Nov 4, seeks to cap the number of shoebox units for projects in suburban areas based on a formula that stipulates that the average size of homes will need to be at least 70 sq...

New rules “discourage” shoebox units outside Central Area

The government is capping the total number of units that can be built on a site for non-landed private residential developments outside the Central Area. This will take effect from November 4 when new guidelines issued by the Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA) take effect. The URA says the new guidelines will discourage developers from building new developments consisting mainly of shoebox units outside...

Resale market finally shakes off ABSD

Preliminary price indices for completed non-landed properties released last week suggest that the resale market for private apartments has finally shaken off the dampening effects of the additional buyer's stamp duty (ABSD) imposed last December. The National University of Singapore's flash Singapore Residential Price Index for last month inched up 0.8 per cent, the second consecutive monthly rise...

Compare listings

Compare